All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
languages of this planet, the word means Home Stone."
He paused, noting my lack of comprehension. "Home
Stone," he repeated. "Simply that."
"In peasant villages on this world," he continued, "each
hut was originally built around a flat stone which was
placed in the center of the circular dwelling. It was
carved with the family sign and was called the Home
Stone. It was, so to speak, a symbol of sovereignty, or
territory, and each peasant, m his own hut, was a
sovereign."
"Later," said my father, "Home Stones were used for
villages, and later still for cities. The Home Stone of a
village was always placed in the market; in a city, on the
top of the highest tower. The Home Stone came
naturally, in time, to acquire a mystique, and something
of the same hot, sweet emotions as our native peoples
of Earth feel toward their flags became invested in it."
My father had risen to his feet and had begun to pace
the room, and his eyes seemed strangely alive.In time I
would come to understand more of what he felt. Indeed,
there is a saying on Gor, a saying whose origin is lost in
the past of this strange planet, that one who speaks of
Home Stones should stand, for matters of honor are
here involved, and honor is respected in the barbaric
codes of Gor.
"These stones," said my father, "are various, of different
colors, shapes, and sizes, and many of them are
intricately carved. Some of the largest cities have small,
rather insignificant Home Stones, but of incredible
At last he spoke again.
"Where a man sets his Home Stone, he claims, by law, that land for himself. Good land is protected only by the swords of the
strongest owners in the vicinity."
"Swords?" I asked.
"Yes," said my father, as if there were nothing incredible in this admission. He smiled.
"You have much to learn of Gor," he said. "Yet there is a hierarchy of Home Stones, one might say, and two soldiers who would cut
one another down with their steel blades for an acre of fertile ground would fight side by side to the death for the Home Stone of their
village or of the city within whose ambit their village lies."
Tarnsman of Gor, pages 26 and 27

Indeed, there is a saying on Gor, a saying whose origin is lost in the past of this strange planet, that one who speaks of Home Stones
should stand, for matters of honor are here involved, and honor is respected in the barbaric codes of Gor." Tarnsman of Gor, page 27

The community of those who had been Waniyanpi, of course, was not identified with a particular area of land, and certainly not with a
territory occupied under the conditions of a leased tenancy. It now, in the Gorean fashion, for the first time, tended to be identified
with a Home Stone. The community could now, if it wished, the Home Stone moving, even migrate to new lands. In Gorean law
allegiances to a Home Stone, and not physical structures and locations, tend to define communities. Blood Brothers of Gor
In Gorean law, allegiances to a Home Stone, and not physical structures and locations, tend to define communities.
Blood Brothers of Gor, Page 474

Indeed, there is a saying on Gor, a saying whose origin is lost in the past of this strange planet, that one who speaks of Home Stone
should stand, for matters of honor are here involved, and honor is respected in the barbaric codes of Gor.
Tarnsman of Gor, page 27
I stood back and made no move to draw my weapon. Though I was of the caste of warriors and he of peasants, and I armed and he
carrying naught but a crude tool, I would not dispute his passage. One does not lightly dispute the passage of one who carries his
Home Stone. Outlaw of Gor, page 1


Whereas I was of high caste and he was of low, yet in his own hut he would be, by the laws of Gor, a prince and sovereign, for then
he would be in the place of his own Home Stone.
Outlaw of Gor, page 28

I think the explanation for the Gorean political arrangements and attitudes in the institution of the Home Stone. It is the Home Stone
which, for the Gorean marks the center. I think it is because of their Home Stone that the Gorean tends to think of territory as
something from the inside out, so to speak, rather than from the outside in. Consider again the analogy of the circle. For the Gorean
the Home Stone would mark the point of the circle's center. It is the Home Stone which, so to speak, determines the circle. There can
be a point without a circle,: but there can be no circle without its central point. But let me not try to speak o Home Stones. If you have
a Home Stone, I need not speak. If you do not have a Home Stone, how could you understand, what I might say? Fighting Slave of
Gor, page 145

Young men and women of the city, when coming of age, participate in a ceremony which involves the swearing of oaths, and the
sharing of bread, fire and salt. In this ceremony the Home Stone of the city is held by each young person and kissed. Only then are the
laurel wreath and the mantle of citizenship conferred. This is a moment no young person of Ar forgets. The youth of Earth have no
Home Stone. Citizenship, interestingly, in most Gorean cities is conferred only upon the coming of age, and only after certain
examinations are passed. Further, the youth of Gor, in most cities, must be vouched for by citizens of the city, not related in blood to
him, and be questioned before a committee of citizens, intent upon determining his worthiness or lack thereof to take the Home Stone
of the city as his own. Citizenship in most Gorean communities is not something accrued in virtue of the accident of birth but earned in
virtue of intent and application. The sharing of a Home Stone is no light thing in a Gorean city. Slave Girl of Gor, page 394

“It has been broken,” said Tasdron. “No longer may it serve as a Home Stone.” Guardsman of Gor, page 271

I wondered about the Home Stones of Gor. Many seem small and quite plain. Yet for these stones, and on account of these stones,
these seemingly inauspicious, simple objects, cities have been built, and burned, armies have clashed, strongmen have wept, empires
have risen and fallen. The simplicity of many of these stones has puzzled me. I have wondered sometimes how it is that they have
become invested with such import. They may, of course, somewhat simply, be thought of as symbolizing various things, and perhaps
different things to different people. They can stand, for example, for a city, and, indeed, are sometimes identified with the city. They,
have some affinity, too, surely, with territoriality and community. Even a remote hut, far from the paved avenues of a town or city, may
have a Home Stone, and therein, in the place of his Home Stone, is the meanest beggar or the poorest peasant a Ubar. The Home
Stone says this place is mine, this is my home. I am here. But I think, often, that it is a mistake to try to translate the Home Stone into
meanings. It is not a word, or a sentence. It does not really translate. It is, more like a tree, or the world. It exists, which goes
beyond, which surpasses, meaning. In this primitive sense the Home Stone is simply that, and irreducibly, the Home Stone. It is too
important, too precious, to mean. And in not meaning, it becomes, of course, the most meaningful of all. It becomes, in a sense, the
foundation of meaning, and, for Goreans, it is anterior to meaning, and precedes meaning. Do not ask a Gorean what the Home Stone
means because he will not understand your question. It will puzzle him. It is the Home Stone. Sometimes I think that many Home
Stones are so simple because they are too important, too precious, to be insulted with decoration or embellishment. And then, too,
sometimes I think that they are kept, on the whole, so simple, because this is a way of saying that everything is important, and
precious, and beautiful, the small stones by the river, the leaves of trees, the tracks of small animals, a blade of grass, a drop of
water, a grain of sand, the world. The word 'Gor', in Gorean, incidentally, means 'Home Stone'. Their name for our common sun, Sol, is
'Tor-tu-Gor' which means 'Light upon the Home Stone'. Magicians of Gor, pages 485, 486
Laws, Codes and Rituals
About the Homestone