It perhaps need only be added that now being a Warrior, and thus of High Caste, he was now eligible for a seat on the High Council
of the city, and even for the throne itself, whether it be that of Administrator or Ubar. Cernus
celebrated his investiture by sponsoring the first games and races of the new season, which began in En'Kara. Assassin of Gor, page
110,111

Raising Caste

I measured Sarus. He would be quick. He was intelligent. He was hard. His accent bespoke a low caste. He had doubtless risen
through the ranks to a position of prominence, which, given the aristocracies of Tyros, was unusual. Family was important on the
cliffed island, as, indeed it was, on the terraces of Cos. Island ubarates, with their relatively stable populations, over a period of
generations, tend to develop concentrations of wealth and power among successful families, which wealth and power, first producing
oligarchy, becomes gradually invested with the prestige of dynastic tradition, at which point, one supposes, one may fairly speak of
aristocracy. Most Gorean cities are, in effect, governed by the influence, direct or indirect, of several important families. In the city of
Ar, one of the great families was once the Hinrabians. Hunters of Gor, page 268

In taking companionship with one of the Warriors she would raise caste, for the Warriors on Gor are among the high castes, of which
there are five, the Initiates, Scribes, Physicians, Builders and Warriors. In many cities only members of the high castes may belong to
the city’s high council. Most Gorean cities are governed by an executive, the Administrator, in conjunction with the high council. Some
cities are governed by a Ubar, who is in effect a military sovereign, sometimes a tyrant, whose word is law: The Ubar’s power is
limited institutionally only by his capacity to inspire and control those whose steel keeps him upon the throne. Sword loyalty is a bond
of fidelity sworn to the Ubar. Gorean warriors seldom break this bond. It is not sworn lightly. It is sworn only to those who are
thought fit to be Ubar. When the Ubar is thought to be unfit, it is thought, too, he has dishonored the pledge of sword loyalty. It is
not then uncommon for him to die beneath the steel of his outraged men. Only a Ubar, it is said, may sit upon the throne of a Ubar.
Only when a true Ubar sits upon the throne is it said the pledge of sword loyalty is binding. It was my hope that the Lady Sabina
would be happy. It was said she was muck pleased to raise caste and would become, by this match, one of the high ladies of the
Salerian Confederation, which was becoming powerful in the north. I did not think much of Thandar of Ti, perhaps because he was a
man. I supposed he was not too pleased at being matched with a girl who was not of the five high castes, but surely he could
appreciate the commercial and political significance of the match, and would be pleased to serve his city by doing his part. From the
point of view of his father the bargain was a good one for Thandar was the youngest and least important of five sons; it was not as
if his first or second son had been matched with a merchant’s daughter; besides the match was politically and commercially
expedient; who knew how ambitious might be the aspirations of Ti, and the Salerian Confederation? Too, from Thandar´s point of
view, if the match turned out to be a misery he, being a Gorean male of high caste, could content himself with bought women, who
would fight one another and beg on their bellies to serve one such as he. Tribesmen of Gor, page 113, 114

Caste Sayings and Anecdotes

I took a coin from the leather sack and threw it to the proprietor. He snatched it expertly from the air like a sceptical cormorant. He
examined the coin. It was a silver tarn disk. He bit against the metal, the muscles on his jaw bulging in the lamplight. A trace of
avaricious pleasure appeared in his eyes. I knew he would not care to return it.

"What caste is it?" I demanded.

The proprietor smiled. "Money has no caste," he said. Outlaw of Gor, page 77, 78

"Yes! I cried, and such words had never before been spoken of Gor. "In this cause," I said, "whether you are of the Caste of
Peasants, or Poets, or Metal Workers, or Saddle-Makers, you must be warriors!" Outlaw of Gor, page 170

He shrugged. "Gold has no caste," he said. Nomads of Gor, page 85, 86


Notes on High Castes

"Actually," I said to Elizabeth, "this is very rare. Thentis does not trade the beans for black wine. I have heard of a cup of black wine
in Ar, some years ago, selling for a silver eighty-piece. Even in Thentis black wine is used commonly only in High Caste homes."
Assassin of Gor, page 107

“I am a citizen of Ar,” said the player. “It is my understanding that the cities of Brundisium and Ar stand leagued firmly in friendship,
that the wine has been drunk between them, and the salt and fire shared, that they are pledged both in comity and alliance, military
and political. If this is not true, I should like to be informed, that word may be carried to Ar of this change in matters. Similarly, I am
curious to know why a player of Cos, no understood ambassador or herald, sits at a high table, at the table even of Belnar, Ubar of
this city. Similarly, how is it that Temenides, only a player, and one of Cos, as well, to whom both Brundisium and AR stand opposed,
to whom both accord their common defiance, dares to speak so boldly? Perhaps something has occurred of which I was not informed,
that ubars now take their orders from enemies, and those not even of high caste?” Players of Gor, page 321


“It is said that even numbers of the High Council, as a token, have come to the wall, loosened a stone, and tumbled it down.”

“Thus do they demonstrate their loyalty to the state,” he said.

“Yes,” I said.

“The state of Cos,” he said, angrily.

“Many high-caste youth, on the other hand, work side by side with low-caste fellows, dismantling the wall.”

“They are levied?” asked Marcus.

“Not the higher castes,” I said.

“They volunteer?” he asked.

“Like many of these others,” I said.

“Incredible,” said he.

“Youth is idealistic,” I said. Magicians of Gor, page 119


About Low Castes

What had happened would have been regarded by the untrained Gorean mind, particularly that of a low caste individual, as evidence
of some supernatural force, as some magical effect of the will of the Priest-Kings. I myself did not willingly entertain such hypotheses.
Outlaw of Gor, page 182

Portus laughed bitterly. "Without the gold of this house, how could the Administrator and the High Initiate have sponsored the races
and the games that won them favor of the lower castes?"

"But the lower castes do not elect the Administrator or the High Initiate," said Kuurus, "The Administrator is appointed by the high
Council of the City and the High Initiate by the High Council of the Initiates of the City."

"The councils," said Portus scornfully, "know well the way the lower castes yelp in their tiers." He snorted." And there are many in the
High Councils of the City who, if forced to decide between steel of the hook knife and the feel of gold in their pouch, will choose gold
to steel." Portus winked at Kuurus. "There is only gold and steel," he said. Assassin of Gor, page 18, 19

Equalling and perhaps exceeding the fame of Gladius of Cos was that of the swordsman Murmillius, of the cruel games observed in
the Stadium of Blades. Since the beginning of En'Kara he had fought more than one hundred and twenty times, and one hundred and
twenty foes had fallen before him, which, following his unusual custom, he had never slain, regardless of the will of the crowd. Some
of the best swordsmen of Ar, even Warriors of High Caste, eager to be the one to best the mysterious Murmillius, had dared to enter
the arena against him, but each of these bold gentlemen he seemed to treat with more scorn than his common foes, playing with
them and then, it seemed when he wished, disabling their sword arm, so cruelly that perhaps they might never again be able to lift
the steel. Condemned criminals and men of low caste, fighting for gold or freedom in the arena, he treated with the harsh courtesies
obtaining among sword brothers. The crowd, each time he fought, went mad with pleasure, thrilling to each ringing stroke of steel,
and I suspected that that man most adored in Ar was the huge, mysterious Murmillius, superb and gallant, a man whose very city
was unknown. Assassin of Gor, page 231

Most of the individuals in the Central Cylinder were men of lower caste, attending to their duties, with the exception of numerous
Scribes. I saw two Physicians. From time to time I saw a slave girl in the halls. Assassin of Gor, page 393

I measured Sarus. He would be quick. He was intelligent. He was hard. His accent bespoke a low caste. He had doubtless risen
through the ranks to a position of prominence, which, given the aristocracies of Tyros, was unusual. Family was important on the
cliffed island, as, indeed it was, on the terraces of Cos. Island ubarates, with their relatively stable populations, over a period of
generations, tend to develop concentrations of wealth and power among successful families, which wealth and power, first producing
oligarchy, becomes gradually invested with the prestige of dynastic tradition, at which point, one supposes, one may fairly speak of
aristocracy. Most Gorean cities are, in effect, governed by the influence, direct or indirect, of several important families. In the city of
Ar, one of the great families was once the Hinrabians. Hunters of Gor, page 268

Sometimes as often as every fourth or fifth day I was hooded and chained, and placed in a wagon, usually with some fellow slaves,
fighters, too. I would then be unchained and unhooded, in my turn, in a shallow pit, about which free persons, almost always of low
caste, would be gathered. Fighting slave of Gor, page 240
The Waiting Hand is a time, in general, of misery, silence and fasting. It is also, for many Goreans, particularly those of the lower
castes, a time of uneasiness, a time of trepidation and apprehension. Players of Gor, page 10

Also, paradoxically, Tharna´s first minister, who stands second only to the Tatrix, is not of high caste but of lowly origin, only of the
metal workers. His name, it is said, is Kron. Such things, I think, make Tharna an unusual city. Dancer of Gor, page 385
Most Goreans, incidentally, do not attribute lightning and thunder to the grinding of flour of Priest-Kings. They regard such things as
charming myths, which they have now outgrown. Some of the lower castes, however, particularly that of the peasants, and
particularly those in outlying villages, do entertain the possibility that such phenomena may be the signs of disunion among Priest-
Kings and their conflicts, the striking of weapons, the rumbling of their chariots, the trampling of their tharlarion, and such. Even more
sophisticated Goreans, however, if not of the Scribes or Builders, have been noted to speculate that lightning is the result of clouds
clashing together in the sky, showering sparks, and such. Few people, I suppose, see the unity of such phenomena as lightning and
the crackling in the stroked fur of a hunting sleen. Renegades of Gor, page 18, 19

These fellows, I think, were serious. It might be mentioned, at any rate, that many Goreans, particularly those of lower caste, and
who are likely to have had access only to the “first knowledge”, take things of this sort very seriously, believing they are witness not
to tricks and illusions but to marvellous phenomena consequent upon the gifts and powers of unusual individuals, sorcerers or
magicians. This ingenuousness is doubtless dependent upon several factors, such as the primitiveness of the world, the isolation and
uniqueness of the cities, the disparateness of cultures and the tenuousness of communication. Magicians of Gor, page 254

“But what could one such as you, of low caste,” said the voice, “know of one of my sensitivity and nature? How could one such as
you understand the feelings of one such as I?”
“Only with great difficulty, if at all, doubtless,” said I, perhaps somewhat testily.
“But have no fear,” said she. “I will be patient with you. We are, after all, despite the discrepancies in our caste, sisters in sorrow, in
misery and grief.” Witness of Gor, page 243

Names and Usenames

"Talena is my true name," she said. Of High Caste, it was natural that she was above the common superstitions connected with
revealing one's name. Tarnsman of Gor, page 107

"I am Zosk," he said.

I wondered if it were a use-name, or his real name. Members of low castes often call themselves by a use-name, reserving the real
name for intimates and friends, to protect it against capture by a sorcerer or worker of spells who might use it to do them harm.
Somehow I sensed that Zosk was his real name. Outlaw of Gor, page 30

If one, of course, finds oneself in effect without caste or clan, as was perhaps the case with the small fool named Hup, and one
cannot work, one's life is likely to be miserable and no of great length. Moreover, Goreans are extremely sensitive about names, and
who may speak them. Indeed, some, particularly those of the low caste, even have use names, concealing their true names lest they
be discovered by enemies and used to conjure spells against them. Similarly, slaves, on the whole, do not address free men by their
names. Kuurus surmised that Portus doubtless a man of importance, had been troubled by the little fool Hup on more than one
occasion, and had now decided to do away with him. Assassin of Gor, Page 11, 12
All rights reserved.
Castes of Gor
Changing or Raising Castes
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
Further, because of his services to the state, including
the sponsorship of games and races, Cernus was, upon
the petition of Saphronicus, Captain of the Taurentians,
invested in the scarlet of the Warrior, thus honoring
him with High Caste. He did not, of course, give up the
House of Cernus nor any other of his widely ranging
interests in Ar and beyond it. I do not suppose the
Hinrabian Administrator much cared to approve this
raising of caste in the case of Cernus, but he lacked the
courage to go against the wishes of the Taurentians,
and of the city generally. The High Council, with scarcely
a murmur, agreed to the investiture. That he was now
of the Caste of Warriors did not change much with
Cernus, of course, save that a strip of red silk, with
those of blue and yellow, now adorned his left sleeve.


I did know that Cernus had been, for years, trained in
the use of weapons. Indeed, he was said to be, and I
do not doubt it, first sword in the house. He had
doubtless hired masters of arms because he wished to
acquire skill in weapons, but I think, too, he may, even
for years, have had in mind his investiture as Warrior.