Accordingly the Gorean artist tends not so much to be proud of his work as, oddly enough perhaps, to be grateful to it, that it
consented to speak through him. As the hunters of the north, the singers of the ice pack and of the long night have it, “No one
knows from whence songs come.” It is enough, and more than enough, that they come. They dispel the cold, they illuminate the
darkness. They are welcomed, in the darkness and cold, like fire, and friendship and love. The focus of the Gorean artist then, at
least on the whole, tends to be on the work of art itself, not on himself as artist. Accordingly this attitude toward his art is less likely
to be one of pride than one of gratitude. This makes sense as, in his view, it is not so much he who speaks as the world, in its many
wonders, great and small, which speaks through him. He is thusly commonly more concerned to express the world, and truth, than
himself. Magicians of Gor, page 107, 108

CASTE OF BAKERS

I stayed four days in the rooms above the shop of Dina of Turia. There I dyed my hair black and exchanged the robes of the
merchant for the yellow and brown tunic of the Bakers, to which caste her father and two brothers had belonged. Nomads of Gor,
Page 237

The Caste of Bakers is not regarded as a high caste, to which one looks for nobility and such; and yet her father and her brothers,
outnumbered, had fought and died for their tiny shop; and this courageous girl, with a valor I might not have expected of many
warriors, weaponless, alone and friendless, had immediately, asking nothing in return, leaped to my aid, giving me the protection of
her home, and her silence, placing at my disposal her knowledge of the city and whatever resources might be hers to command.
Nomads of Gor, Page 239

I knew that while the Tuchuks remained in Turia

there would be in all the city no woman more safe than lovely Dina, she only of the Caste of Bakers. Nomads of Gor, Page 252

Less impressive perhaps but even more essential to the operation of the House were its kitchens, its laundries, commissaries and
storerooms; its medical facilities, in which dental care is also provided; its corridors of rooms for staff members, all of whom live in
the House; its library, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers and Leather
Workers; its wardrobe and jewellery chambers; its tarncots, two of them, opening by means of vast portals to tarn perches fixed in
the side of the cylinder. Assassin of Gor, page 111

BARGEMEN

These barges, constructed of layered timbers of Ka-la-na wood, are towed by teams of river tharlarion, domesticated, vast,
herbivorous, web-footed lizards raised and driven by the Cartius bargemen, fathers and sons, interrelated clans, claiming the
status of a caste for themselves. Nomads of Gor, page 3, 4

CARDERS AND DYERS

The carders and the dyers, incidentally, are subcastes separate from the weavers. All are subcastes of the rug makers, which, itself,
interestingly, perhaps surprisingly, is accounted generally as a subcaste of the cloth workers. Rug makers themselves, however,
usually regard themselves, in their various subcastes, as being independent of the cloth workers. A rug maker would not care to he
confused with a maker of kaftans, turbans or djellabas.
I looked up at skeins of wool hanging from the wooden poles between the flat roofs. They were quite colorful. The finest wool,
however, is sheared in the spring from the bellies of the verr and hurt, and would, accordingly, not be available until later in the
season. The wool market, as was to be expected, was now slow. Tribesmen of Gor, page 49-50

CLOTH WORKER

Less impressive perhaps but even more essential to the operation of the House were its kitchens, its laundries, commissaries and
storerooms; its medical facilities, in which dental care is also provided; its corridors of rooms for staff members, all of whom live in
the House; its library, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers and Leather
Workers; its wardrobe and jewellery chambers; its tarncots, two of them, opening by means of vast portals to tarn perches fixed in
the side of the cylinder. Assassin of Gor, page 111

Of the two hundred remaining double tarns from the victory in the Ubar's race I gave all but one to free Melanie, who had served in
the kitchens of Cernus, and arrange a livelihood for her. With the money remaining over from her purchase price, which was
negligible, she, who had been of the Cloth Workers, could open a shop in Ar, purchase materials, and hire men of her caste to aid
her in the work. Assassin of Gor, page 399

I heard someone ask, "Was she of High Caste?"

"I was the daughter of a Cloth Worker," said Melanie. Assassin of Gor, page 317

At various places in the bazaar, from a latticework laid between the buildings, numerous skeins of wool hung, dyed in various bright
colors, drying. The carders and the dyers, incidentally, are subcastes separate from the weavers. All are subcastes of the rug
makers, which, itself, interestingly, perhaps surprisingly, is accounted generally as a subcaste of the cloth workers.
Rug makers themselves, however, usually regard themselves, in their various subcastes, as being independent of the cloth
workers. A rug maker would not care to he confused with a maker of kaftans, turbans or djellabas. Tribesmen of Gor, page49, 50

COSMETICIANS

Of the two hundred remaining double tarns from the victory in the Ubar's race I gave all but one to free Melanie, who had served in
the kitchens of Cernus, and arrange a livelihood for her. With the money remaining over from her purchase price, which was
negligible, she, who had been of the Cloth Workers, could open a shop in Ar, purchase materials, and hire men of her caste to aid
her in the work. Assassin of Gor, page 399

Tor was, as Gorean cities went, rich, trading city. It was headquarters for thousands of caravan merchants. In it, too, were housed
many craftsmen, practicing their industries, carvers, varnishers, table makers, gem cutters, jewellers, carders, dyers of cloth,
weavers of rugs, tanners, makers of slippers, toolers of leather, potters, glaziers, makers of cups and kettles, weapon smiths, and
many others. Much of the city, of course, was organized to support the caravan trade. There were many walled, guarded
warehouses, requiring their staffs of scribes and guards, and, in hundreds of hovels, lived kaiila tenders, drovers, and such, who
would, at the caravan tables, when their moneys had been exhausted, apply, if accepted, making their mark on the roster, once
more for a post with some new caravan. Guards for these caravans, incidentally, were usually known by, and retained by, caravan
merchants between caravans. They were known men. Tenders and drovers, on the whole, came and went. Tribesmen of Gor, page
39

I fingered them. “I doubt you sewed these yourself,” I said. “They were probably done by a Cloth Worker. Consider the stitching,
the tightness if the stitches, its regularity and fineness. It seems very professional. Doubtless though it was done according to your
directions. Renegades of Gor, page 236

DROVERS

There were many walled, guarded warehouses, requiring their staffs of scribes and guards, and, in hundreds of hovels, lived kaiila
tenders, drovers, and such, who would, at the caravan tables, when their moneys had been exhausted, apply, if accepted, making
their mark on the roster, once more for a post with some new caravan. Guards for these caravans, incidentally, were usually known
by, and retained by, caravan merchants between caravans. They were known men. Tenders and drovers, on the whole, came and
went. Tribesmen of Gor, page 39

HARNESS MAKERS

It was Harness Street, apparently so called from long ago when it was once a locale of several harness makers. The “harness
makers” on Gor, provide not just harnesses but an entire line of associated products, such as saddles, bridles, reins, hobbling and
tethers. Presumably the harness makers on this street would not have dealt in slave harnesses. That product would have been
more likely to have been, as it still was, available on the “Street of Brands,” a district in which are found many of the houses of
slavers, sales barns, sales arenas, holding areas, boarding accommodations, training facilities, and shops dealing with product lines
pertinent to slaves, such as collars, cosmetics, jewellery, perfumes, slave garb, chains, binding fiber and disciplinary devices. In such
a district one may have a girl's septum or ears pierced. There are many varieties of slave harness, incidentally, with various
purposes, such as discipline, display and security. Many of them are extremely lovely on a woman, and many, by such adjustments
as cinching, tightening, and buckling, may be fitted closely and exquisitely to the individual slave. Players of Gor, page 109

GLAZIERS

Tor was, as Gorean cities went, rich, trading city. It was headquarters for thousands of caravan merchants. In it, too, were housed
many craftsmen, practicing their industries, carvers, varnishers, table makers, gem cutters, jewellers, carders, dyers of cloth,
weavers of rugs, tanners, makers of slippers, toolers of leather, potters, glaziers, makers of cups and kettles, weapon smiths, and
many others. Much of the city, of course, was organized to support the caravan trade.

HUNTSMEN

They then, in the brief green tunics of the slaves of huntsmen, shouldered their burdens and followed their masters through the
double gate of the palisade. Their lives would be hard, but I did not think them dismayed, nor unhappy. The huntsman lives a free
and open life, as wild and swift, and secret as the beasts he hunts, and his slaves, whom he insists on accompanying him, must,
too, learn the ways of the forests, the flowers and the animals, the leaves and wind. I do not know where Raf and Pron may now
be, but I know them well served by two wenches, the slave girl, Inge, and the slave girl, Rena, who were well trained in the pens of
Ko-ro-ba, and who loves them. Hunters of Gor, page 252

JEWELLERS

Tor was, as Gorean cities went, rich, trading city. It was headquarters for thousands of caravan merchants. In it, too, were housed
many craftsmen, practicing their industries, carvers, varnishers, table makers, gem cutters, jewellers, carders, dyers of cloth,
weavers of rugs, tanners, makers of slippers, toolers of leather, potters, glaziers, makers of cups and kettles, weapon smiths, and
many others. Much of the city, of course, was organized to support the caravan trade. There were many walled, guarded
warehouses, requiring their staffs of scribes and guards, and, in hundreds of hovels, lived kaiila tenders, drovers, and such, who
would, at the caravan tables, when their moneys had been exhausted, apply, if accepted, making their mark on the roster, once
more for a post with some new caravan. Guards for these caravans, incidentally, were usually known by, and retained by, caravan
merchants between caravans. They were known men. Tenders and drovers, on the whole, came and went. Tribesmen of Gor, page
39

LEATHER WORKERS

At the age of twelve, Ute had been purchased by a leather worker, who dwelt on the exchange island, administered by the
Merchants, of Teletus. He, and his companion, had cared for her, and had freed her. They had adopted her as their daughter, and
had seen that she was trained well in the work of the leather workers, that caste, which, under any circumstances, had been hers
by right of birth. Hunters of Gor, Page 233

Less impressive perhaps but even more essential to the operation of the House were its kitchens, its laundries, commissaries and
storerooms; its medical facilities, in which dental care is also provided; its corridors of rooms for staff members, all of whom live in
the House; its library, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers and Leather
Workers; its wardrobe and jewellery chambers; its tarncots, two of them, opening by means of vast portals to tarn perches fixed in
the side of the cylinder. Assassin of Gor, page 111
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
ARTISTS

I might also mention, in passing, if only to make the controversy concerning the “Auborbion
marbles” more understandable, that many Gorean artists do not sign or otherwise identify
their works. The rationale for this seems to be a conviction that what is important is the art,
its power, its beauty, and so on, and now who formed it. Indeed many Gorean artists seem
to regard themselves as little more than vessels or instruments, the channels or means,
the tools, say, the chisels or brushes, so to speak, by means of diversities, in its beauties
and powers, its flowers and storms, its laughters andrages, its delicacy and awesomeness,
its subtlety and grandeur, expresses itself, and rejoices.