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Beverages of Gor
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
five gallons....The tankard then, with two great bronze handles, was passed from hands to hands among the rowers. The men threw
back their heads and, the liquid spilling down their bodies, drank ale. It was victory ale. Marauders of Gor, page 99
Bazi Tea
Tea is extremely important to the nomads. It is served hot and heavily sugared. It gives them strength then, in virtue of the sugar,
and cools the, by making them sweat as well as stimulating them. It is drunk three small cups at a time, carefully measured.
Tribesman of Gor, page 38
"'Is it ready?' I asked. I looked at the tiny copper kettle on the small stand. A tiny kaiila dung fire burned under it. A small, heavy,
curved glass was nearby, on a flat box, which would hold some two ounces of the tea. Bazi tea is drunk in tiny glasses, usually three
at a time, carefully measured. She did not make herself tea, of course. She lifted the kettle from the fire and, carefully, poured me a
tiny glass of tea." Tribesman of GOR, page 139
Blackwine  
Blackwine is the equivalent to Earth coffee, there is always a fresh kettle on the stove. Served in a mug, First slave is with milk and
sugar, Second slave is black.
I had heard of black wine, but had never had any. It is drunk in Thentis, but I had never heard of it being much drunk in other Gorean
cities. Then I picked up one of the thick, heavy clay bowls...It was extremely strong, and bitter, but it was hot, and, unmistakably, it
was coffee. Assassins of Gor, page 106
The expression "second slave," incidentally, serves to indicate that one does not wish creams or sugars with one's black wine, even if
only one girl is serving. Guardsman of Gor, page 245
Chocolate
Brought from Earth and grown in the tropical regions and  Jungles of Schendi.
'This is warmed chocolate,' I said, pleased. It was very rich and creamy. 'Yes Mistress.' said the girl. 'It is very good,' I said. 'Thank you,
Mistress,' she said. 'Is it from Earth?' I asked. 'Not directly,' she said. 'Many things here, of course, ultimately have an Earth origin. It is
not improbable that the beans from which the first cacao trees on this world were grown were brought from Earth.' 'Do the trees
grow near here?' I asked. 'No Mistress,' she said, 'we obtain the beans from which the chocolate is made, from Cosian merchants,
who in turn, obtain them in the tropics." Kajira of Gor, page 61
Fermented Milk Curds
By one fire I could see a squat Tuchuk, hands on hips, dancing and stamping about by himself, drunk on fermented milk curds,
dancing, according to Kamchak, to please the sky. Nomads of Gor, page 28
Juice
Any fruit can be made into juice of course, at times when no ice is available to serve cool, they are served in amphoras which are kept in
the cool ground. There is ramberry, peach, ta-grape, tospit, larma, etc.
I purchased her some larma juice for a tarsk bit.
“Yes,” she said. The morning was hot.
It would have been stored overnight, I assumed, in an amphora, buried to the neck in the cool earth. Sometimes Earth girls, first
brought to Gor, do not understand why so many of these two-handled, narrow-necked vessels have such a narrow, usually pointed
base, for they cannot stand upright on such a base. They have not yet learned that these vessels are not the necks above the earth,
the pointed base, of course, presses into the soft earth at the bottom of the storage hole. Mercenaires of Gor, page 25
About Gorean wines
This is not that unusual at an inn. The proportions, then, would be one part paga to five parts water. Commonly, at a paga tavern,
the paga would be cut less, or not cut at all. When wine is drunk with Gorean meals, at home, incidentally, it is almost always diluted,
mixed with water in a krater. At a party or convivial supper the host, or elected feast master, usually determines the proportions of
water to wine. Unmixed wine, of course, may be drunk, for example, at the parties of young men, at which might appear dancers,
flute slaves and such. Many Gorean wines, it might be mentioned, if only by way of explanation, are very strong, often having an
alcoholic content by volume of forty to fifty percent. Renegades of Gor, page 70
Ka-la-na
After the meal, I tasted the drink, which might not inappropriately be described as an almost incandescent wine, bright, dry, and
powerful. I learned later it was called Ka-la-na. While I ate, and afterwards, my father spoke. Tarnsman of Gor page 26

Aphris got up and fetched not a skin, but a bottle, of wine, Ka-la-na wine, from the Ka-la-na orchards of great Ar itself. Nomads of
Gor, page 151
For info on Free Women and ka-la-na,
click here...
Kalda  
Made from diluted Ka-la-na, mixed with citrus juices and stinging spices. Popular with the lower caste, may be served in a goblet or a mug,
always served hot.
Kal-da is a hot drink, almost scalding, made of diluted Ka-la-na wine, mixed with citrus juices and stinging spices. I did not performed
strenuous manual labor. I expected its popularity was due more to its capacity to warm a man and stick to his ribs, and to its
cheapness (a poor grade of Ka-la-na wine being used in its brewing) than to any gustatory excellence. Outlaw of Gor, page 76
Liqueurs
The liqueurs of Turia are usually regarded as the best, but I think this is largely a matter of taste. Those of Cos and AR, and of certain
other cities, are surely very fine. Kajira of Gor, page 406
Mead
In the north generally, mead, a drink made with fermented honey and water, and often spices and such, tends to be favored over
paga. Vagabonds of Gor, page 16
I handed the horn to Thyri, who, in her collar, naked, between two of the benches, knelt at my feet. 'Yes, Jarl,' said she, and ran to fill
it, from the great vat. How marvelously beautiful is a naked, collared woman. 'Your hall,' said I to the Forkbeard, 'is scarcely what I
had expected.' 'Here, Jarl,' said Thyri, again handing me the horn. It was filled with the mead of
Milk
When the meat was ready, Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk. Nomads of Gor, page 139

"...the suckling of the young in the sand kaiila is a valuable trait in the survival of the animal;
kaiila milk, which is used , like verr milk,
by the peoples of the Tahari, is reddish, and has a strong, salty taste; it contains much ferrous sulphate; a similar difference between
the two animals, or two the sorts of kaiila, is that the sand kaiila is omnivorous, whereas the southern kaiila is strictly carnivorous.
both have storage tissues; if necessary, both can go several days without water; the southern kaiila also, however, has a storage
stomach and can go several days without meat; the sand kaiila. Tribesman of Gor, page 71

I saw four small
milk bosk grazing on the short grass. In the distance, above the acres, I could see mountains, snow-capped. A flock
of verr, herded by a maid with a stick, turned, bleating on the sloping hillside. She shaded her eyes. She was blond; she was barefoot;
she wore an ankle-length white kirtle, of white wool, sleeveless, split to her belly. About her neck, I could see a dark ring. Marauders of
Gor, page 81
The smell of fruit and vegetables, and verr milk, was strong." Savages of Gor, page 60
Palm Wine
One of her most delicious exports is palm wine. Explorers of Gor, page 115
Rence Beer  
Fermented from the seeds and pith of the rence plant.
At such times there is drinking of rence beer, steeped, boiled and fermented from the crushed seeds and the whitish pith of the plant.
Raiders of Gor, page 18
Sa Tarna Paga
I may have drunk too much of that fermented brew, concocted with fiendish skill from the yellow grain, Sa-Tarna, and called
Pagar-Sa-Tarna, Pleasure of the Life-Daughter, but almost always "Paga" for short." Tarnsman of Gor, page 59
Before we set out we broke open the great bottle of paga, and Thurnock, Clitus, and I clashed goblets and emptied them of their
swirling fires. Then we forced each of the girls, choking and sputtering, to themselves upturn a goblet, swilling down as best they could
the fiery draught. Raiders of Gor, page 113
I went to the wagon to fetch a large bota of paga, which had been filled from one of the large jugs. Captive of Gor, page 112
"Paga and bread are two tarsks," she said. "Other food may be purchased from three to five tarsks."
"Is the paga cut?" I asked.
This is not that unusual at an inn. The proportions, then, would be one part paga to five parts water. Commonly, at a paga tavern, the
paga would be cut less, or not cut at all. When wine is drunk with Gorean meals, at home, incidentally, it is almost always diluted, mixed
with water in a krater. At a party or convivial supper the host, or elected feast master, usually determines the proportions of water to
wine. Unmixed wine, of course, may be drunk, for example, at the parties of young men, at which might appear dancers, flute slaves
and such. Many Gorean wines, it might be mentioned, if only by way of explanation, are very strong, often having an alcoholic content
by volume of forty to fifty percent. Renegades of Gor, page 70
Sul Paga
Sul paga is, when distilled, though the Sul itself is yellow, as clear as water. The Sul is a tuberous root of the Sul plant; it is a staple.
The still, with its tanks and pipes, lay within the village that of the Tabuk's Ford, in which Thurnus, our host, was caste leader.
'Excellent,' said my master, sipping the Sul paga. He could have been commenting only on the potency of the drink, for Sul paga is
almost tasteless. One does not guzzle Sul paga. Last night one of the men held my head back and forced me to swallow a mouthful. In
moments things had gone black, and I had fallen unconscious. I had awakened only this morning, ill, miserable, with a splitting
headache. Slave Girl of Gor, page 134
"My Master extended his cup to me, and I, kneeling, filled it with Sul paga. I pressed my lips to the cup, and handed it to him. My eyes
smarted. I almost felt drunk from the fumes." Slave Girl of Gor page 134
Ta Wine
'Thank you, Master," I said, and drank some swallows of the beverage. It was Ta wine, from the Ta grapes of the terraces of Cos.
Such a small thing, in its way, bespoke the intimacy of the trade relations between Vonda and Cos. In the last year heavy import
duties had been levied by the high council of Vonda against the wines of certain other cities, in particular against the Ka-la-na's of Ar.
Fighting Slave of Gor, page 306
Turian Wine
I did not much care for the sweet, syrupy wines of Turia, flavored and sugared to the point where one could almost leave one's
fingerprint on their surface. Nomads of Gor, pages 83-84
Ale