Birds of Gor
Jards
“No,” she said. “We content ourselves with prime hide. Most of the animals we leave for the larts
and sleen, and the jards.” The jard is a small scavenger. It flies in large flocks. A flock, like flies,
can strip the meat from a tabuk in minutes.
“Even the jards die, gorged with meat,” said the man near us on the platform.
Within the next Ahn we passed more than sixty bodies, dangling at the side of the river. None
was that of Shaba. About some of these bodies there circled scavenging birds. On the shoulders
of some perched small, yellow-winged jards. One was attacked even by zads, clinging to it and
tearing at it with their long, yellowish, slightly curved beaks. These were jungle zads. They are
less to be feared than desert zads, I believe, being less aggressive. They do, however, share
one ugly habit with the desert zad, that of tearing out the eyes of weakened victims. That serves
as a practical guarantee that the victim, usually an animal, will die. Portions of flesh the zad will
swallow and carry back to its nest, where it will disgorge the flesh into the beaks of its fledglings.
The zad is, in its way, a dutiful parent. Explorers of Gor, page 415
Fleers
They were stripped. There were no kaiila. Insects swam in the air above several of the bodies.
One could hear their humming. Two jards, fluttering, fought in at opened abdominal cavity.
Several yellow fleer stalked about and some perched on motionless limbs. Saddles and clothing
cut to pieces, lay strewn about. Savages of Gor, page 160
Mindar
Kisu pointed overhead. “See the mindar,” he said.
We looked up and saw a brightly plumaged, short-winged, sharp-billed bird. It was yellow and
red.
“That is a forest bird,” said Kisu.
The mindar is adapted for short, rapid flights, almost spurts, its wings beating in sudden
flurries,: hurrying it from branch to branch, for camouflage in flower trees, and for drilling the
bark of such trees for larvae and grubs. Explorers of Gor, page 282
Gim
“Oh!” cried the girl, startled. A grasshopper, red, the size of a horned gim, a small, owllike bird,
some four ounces in weight, common in the northern latitudes, had leaped near the fire, and
disappeared into the brush. Explorers of Gor, page 293
GULLS
A few dozen yards to my right a fish leaped out of the water and disappeared again, leaving
behind him bright, glistening, spreading circles. I heard the cry of two gulls overhead. Captive
of Gor, page 80-81
TUMITS
…beyond them I saw one of the tumits, a large, flightless bird whose hooked beak, as long as
my forearm, attested only too clearly to its gustatory habits,…Nomads of Gor, page 2

The canopy or zone extends from the ground to the beginning of the canopies above, some sixty feet in height, Gorean measure.
We may emergents there live primarily birds, in particular
parrots, long-billed fleers, and needle-tailed lits. Monkeys and tree
urts, and snakes and insects, however, can also be found in this highest level. In the second level, that of the canopies, is found an
squirrels, climbing long-tailed porcupines, lizards, sloths, and the usual varieties of insects, ants, centipedes, scorpions, beetles and
flies, and so on. In the lower portion of the canopies, too, can be found heavier birds, such as the
ivory-billed woodpecker and
the umbrella bird
. Guernon monkeys too, usually inhabit this level. In the ground zone, and on the ground itself, are certain birds,
some flighted, like the
hook-billed gort, which preys largely on rodents, such as ground urts, and the insectivorous whistling finch,
and some
unflighted, like the grub borer and land gim. Along the river, of course, many other species of birds may be found, such
as
jungle gants, tufted fishers and ring-necked and yellow-legged waders. Also in the ground zone are varieties of snake, such
as the ost and hith, and numerous species of insects. The rock spider has been mentioned, and termites, also.

Termites, incidentally, are extremely important to the ecology of the forest. In their feeding they break down and destroy the
branches and trunks of fallen trees. The termite "dust" thereafter, by the action of bacteria, is reduced to humus, and
the humus to nitrogen and mineral.In the lower branches of the "ground zone" may be found also, small animals, such as tarsiers,
nocturnal jit monkeys, black squirrels, four-toed leaf urts, jungle varts and the prowling, solitary giani, tiny, cat-sized panthers, not
dangerous to man. On the floor itself are also found several varieties of animal life, in particular marsupials, such as the armored
gatch, and rodents, such as slees and ground urts. Several varieties of tarsk, large and small, also inhibit this zone. More than six
varieties of anteater are also found here, and more than twenty kinds of small, fleet, single-horned tabuk. ON the jungle floor, as
well, are found jungle larls and jungle panthers, of diverse kinds, and many smaller catlike predators. These, on the whole, avoid
men.

They are less dangerous in the rain forest, than in the northern latitudes. I do not know why this should be the case. Perhaps it is
because in the rain forest food is usually plentiful for them, and, thus there is little temptation for them to transgress the
boundaries of their customary prey categories. They will, however, upon occasion, particularly if provoked or challenged, attack with
dispatch.  Conspicuously absent in the rain forest of the UA were sleen. This is just as well for the sleen, commonly, hunts on the
first scent it takes upon emerging from its burrow after dark. Moreover it hunts single-mindedly and tenaciously. It can be extremely
dangerous to men, even more so, I think, than the Voltai, or northern larl. I think the sleen, which is widespread on Gor, is not
found, or not frequently found, in the jungles because of the enormous rains, and the incredible dampness and humidity. Perhaps
the sleen, a burrowing, furred animal, finds itself uncomfortable in such a habitat. There is, however, a sleenlike animal, the zeder,
which frequents the UA and her tributaries. It knifes through the water by day and, at night,, returns to its nest, built from sticks
and mud in the branches of a tree overlooking the water.  Explorers of Gor (Electronic book, Loc 6484 of 9717)

Tarns have their own link as it is one of the animals most known on Gor.

Tarns
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
All rights reserved.
This research is done on the series of books written by John Norman, the comments in italics are mine and my point of view.
Woman of Gor
All rights reserved.
Woman of Gor